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Assessment Criteria for Initial IPv6 Allocation

This page details the assessment criteria used during the evaluation of an initial IPv6 allocation which is larger than /29 in size.

Who can request an initial allocation of IPv6 address space?

To be eligible to receive an allocation of IPv6 address space from the RIPE NCC, an organisation must:

  • Be a member of the RIPE NCC
  • Have a plan for making sub-allocations to other organisations and/or end site assignments within two years

What criteria is used when evaluating an initial IPv6 allocation?

(1) Amount of users / extent of infrastructure

An initial IPv6 allocation request is evaluated by first looking at the scope and size of the organisation's customer base and internal infrastructure. The LIR should provide comprehensive documentation showing the amount of end sites, as well as the subnet size required for each end site.  In addition, the LIR should provide documentation showing the need for IPv6 address space within their own network (core, data centre, POP etc.).  

(2) Hierarchical and geographical structure / planned longevity

Once the size and scope of the organisation's network has been defined, the RIPE NCC can consider up to one extra bit for hierarchical/geographical structuring of the organisation or for planned longevity of the allocation.  These considerations are mutually exclusive so it is not possible to receive extra bits for both.  

(a) Hierarchical and geographical structure

Expanding the assessment criteria to include the hierarchical/geographical structure of the organisation enables LIRs to make an addressing plan which allows for aggregated addressing of future assignments within their network.  

For example, an organisation may provide services to eight separate end sites in "City 1".  Providing a /48 assignment to each end site would justify a total usage of /45 per city: 

City 1
/48 /48 /48 /48 /48 /48 /48 /48
|------------------------------------ /45 ------------------------------------|

 

Now let's assume that this organisation provides the same service in a further seven cities in this region. They would justify a total usage of /42 for the region: 

Region 1
City 1City 2City 3City 4City 5City 6City 7City 8
/45 /45 /45 /45 /45 /45 /45 /45
|------------------------------------------------- /42 -------------------------------------------------|

 

Finally, let's assume that the organisation provides the service(s) throughout the country and are currently present in eight regions.  They would justify a total usage of /39 for the country: 

Country 1

Region1

Region2

Region3

Region4

Region5

Region6

Region7

Region8

/42 /42 /42 /42 /42 /42 /42 /42
|---------------------------------------------------------------- /39 ----------------------------------------------------------------|

 

Based on the amount of users and the extent of the infrastructure this would be the maximum amount of IPv6 address space that the LIR could justify for this service.  But what happens when the organisation starts providing services to a new end site in City 1, Region 1?  Must they renumber their network or use a non-contiguous address block?  

Fortunately the answer to this question is "no"; they do not have to renumber their network or use a non-contiguous address block. Taking the structure of the organisation into account, the RIPE NCC can consider up to one extra bit per hierarchical or geographical segmentation.  

(b) Planned longevity

If the hierarchical or geographical structure of the organisation is not applicable then the RIPE community has also allowed expansion of the assessment criteria to include the planned longevity of the allocation.  This also enables LIRs to make an addressing plan which allows for aggregated addressing of future assignments within their network.  

For example, based on the amount of users and the extent of their infrastructure, an organisation providing Internet connectivity to 500,000 home users (with a /48 assignment per user) would justify a total usage of /29.  However, if the organisation can provide comprehensive documentation about the past growth of its services, the RIPE NCC can consider reasonable future growth for a timeframe in line with that for which the historical growth was documented.  

Where a larger initial allocation is requested to support either the hierarchical/geographical structure an organisation or the planned longevity of the allocation, the LIR will be asked to provide additional documentation to justify why a different hierarchy or topology, which consumes less address space, cannot be implemented.  

(3) Segmentation of infrastructure for security 

The final criteria for consideration when evaluating an initial IPv6 allocation is segmentation of the network for specific security requirements.  

For example, an organisation may host a disaster recovery site. Such sites require a completely separate physical infrastructure, with separate addressing requirements, which exactly duplicates the real life operational network.  

Where an LIR requests a larger initial IPv6 allocation based on the segmentation of their infrastructure for security, the RIPE NCC can consider allocating up to one extra bit per network segment.  

To get started with the IPv6 initial allocation request

An LIR should submit the request form from the LIR Portal to request an allocation of IPv6 address space. If the requested prefix is larger than /29, the LIR should provide the following supporting documentation to justify the size:  

  • Addressing/subnetting plan
  • Network topology diagram
  • Size and scope of end sites covered by request
  • Statistics for past network growth (where applicable)
  • Deployment plan (where applicable)

More information

For more information, refer to the RIPE NCC Policy "IPv6 Address Allocation and Assignment Policy".