The RIPE NCC is now allocating IPv4 address space from its last /8. What happens now?

The pool of available IPv4 addresses was exhausted on 1 February, 2011, triggering the "Global Policy for the Allocation of the Remaining IPv4 Address Space".

On 3 February, 2011, the five RIRs each received one of the IANA's five reserved /8 blocks. One /8 is equal to 16.8 million IPv4 addresses. Each RIR has community specific policies dealing with how this /8 is distributed within their respective communities.

The RIPE NCC is now allocating IPv4 address space from the last /8 according to "IPv4 Address Allocation and Assignment Policies for the RIPE NCC Service Region". Each Local Internet Registry (LIR) can receive only one /22 (1,024 IPv4 addresses) upon application for IPv4 resources. To obtain this /22 allocation, the LIR must already have an IPv6 allocation. No new IPv4 Provider Independent (PI) space will be assigned.